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MISR and CALIPSO Observe Hurricane Dorian

MISR and CALIPSO Observe Hurricane Dorian

MISR and CALIPSO Observe Hurricane Dorian   Time Range: August 24 – September 10 2019   Event: Hurricane Dorian
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On August 24, 2019, a tropical wave - a region of low air pressure - developed into a tropical depression about 800 miles southeast of Barbados in the Atlantic Ocean. A region of higher air pressure around the depression steered it westward, where it began to turn into a small cyclone near the Antilles and was reclassified as a tropical storm named Dorian. Dorian quickly intensified to a category 5 hurricane, and made landfall in the Bahamas shortly afterwards on September 1, 2019. The full path of the storm stretched from the tip of southern Florida and the Caribbean all the way up to the coast of Canada, but was the most devastating over the Islands of the Bahamas, where it stayed for about 40 hours. Intense gusts of wind reaching 185 mph lashed the islands when the storm made landfall, devastating the island before weakening and moving northwest on September 3, 2019. The storm then continued to weaken as it moved up the east coast, eventually transitioning into an extratropical cyclone, blasting Nova Scotia and Newfoundland with extreme winds before dissipating near Greenland on September 10, 2019.

 

NASA’s Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellites were two of many tracking the storm as it moved along North America’s east coast. MISR is built and maintained by JPL, and uses spectrometry to view the surface of the earth from several critical angles. CALIPSO is a joint mission between NASA and the French space agency CNES, and uses the backscatter measurements of lidar pulses it sends out to map out vertical columns of the atmosphere. Data from these two satellites can be retrieved from the ASDC DAAC and used by beginner and expert scientists alike to study Dorian and other hurricanes.

 

GET DATA: NASA’s Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellites were two of many tracking the storm as it moved along North America’s east coast. MISR is built and maintained by JPL, and uses spectrometry to view the surface of the earth from several critical angles. CALIPSO is a joint mission between NASA and the French space agency CNES, and uses the backscatter measurements of lidar pulses it sends out to map out vertical columns of the atmosphere. Data from these two satellites can be retrieved from the ASDC DAAC and used by beginner and expert scientists alike to study Dorian and other hurricanes.

 

Dataset Name Format
V3.4 L2 CALIPSO HDF
L2 Cloud Products MISR HDF-EOS

 

References:
https://blogs.nasa.gov/hurricanes/tag/dorian-2019/
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/an-inside-look-at-hurricane-dorian-from...
https://misr.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/latestImagery/
https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/eye-of-the-storm/hurricane-dorian-w...
https://www.weather.gov/mhx/Dorian2019
https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/2019/hurricane-dorian
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=7492